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secretary, leon panetta, confirming that the united states has deployed american troops to help jordan with a civil war across its northern border in syria. this marks the strongest u.s. military response yet to syria's 19 month long civil war. a u.s. defense official saying more than 100 military planners and other troops now operating from a joint u.s. jordanian military center, north of the capital city of amman. that's less than 35 miles from jordan's border with syria. this follows several days of cross border attacks between syria and turkey. a troubling sign that the syrian civil war could explode into a wider conflict. today secretary panetta saying the u.s. is helping jordan deal with tens of thousands of refugees out of syria and getting ready for any potential syrian escalation. >> that's the reason we have our -- a group of our force there is working to help them build a headquarters there and to insure that we make the relationship between the united states and jordan a strong one so that we can deal with all of the possible consequences of what's happening in syria. >> ac
one is still called today. east jerusalem was then part of jordan, and it contained the jews' holiest sites, including their ancient temple, destroyed by the romans. once the temple was destroyed, all that remained was the western wall. this place is important for the jewish people worldwide. ross: this is what people prayed to ever since the second temple was destroyed, ever since the jewish people were dispersed. narrator: but because they were in jordanian east jerusalem, the site was off limits to jews until 1967. that year, israel defeated threatening arab armies in the six-day war and gained control over more territory. from syria they took the golan heights. from egypt they captured the sinai peninsula and the gaza strip. from jordan they occupied the west bank of the jordan river, including the rest of jerusalem. ross: after the six-day war, after the victory in '67, with the unification of jerusalem, one of the very first things done by a labor-led government was to make it clear that jerusalem would never be divided again. narrator: israel had moved its capital to jerusalem
between israel and jordan. does that come to play with something you said. >> another excellent question. three home run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very 0 supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in israel, israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off the coastline, and there's also the potential for such new energy sources off of cypress, off of lebanon, and we have been urging diplomatically that everybody work out their boundaries, that gets me back to one of the points i was making because there's often overlapping claimant -- -- claims and unless they're resolved stand in the way of the commercial exemployeation of whatever the reserves night be. it's in everyone's interest to try to make sure. everybody know where the boundaries are and people are able to let contracts that will be legally recognized in order to see what potential is available. similarly with respect to the pipeline, as you know, the pipeline fro
him is that he was the principal, secret negotiator of the israel/jordan peace treaty, and it's easy to forget that, that role, but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the region is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today, i'm told the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty, will abide by the peace treaty with israel, but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it, and so have we, for many years. as haleh said, we watch developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are faring in the arab awakening. last month a former deputy secretary of state and ambassador tom pickering and other senior national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of middle east experience presented a rep
said syrians had fled the country, almost a third had fled. jordan and the u.n. are working to get children back in school but there are challenges. take a listen. >> there are two problems here in jordan. one is that i was just at the zatari camp near the border where there are about 30,000 refugees and where you started from scratch with unhcr and others just a couple months ago and we are building schools and finding teachers, both jordanian and syrian to teach the kids, but the problem is winter is coming and it is all tents right now. so urgently we are working to bring in prefabricated buildings and others. but about two-thirds of the refugees from syria have scattered in jordan and are living in communities where we are working to bring them into schools because with typical arab hospitality, the jordanians are welcoming them into the public school system. so there's a lot of work there. the main problem, of course, is all the schools in syria. we are seeing a tenth of them damaged. there are a lot of kids out of school and we are very actively trying to get them into school
goes on, the greater the danger to international peace and security. >> in jordan, like turkey, more and more assyrian refugees are arriving, reinforcing a sinking pealing in the region that the crisis is spreading. diplomacy has not stopped the war and now is struggling even to content. >> no one wants an escalation lease area, but might it happen anyway? turning to the presidential debate, it was seen for a make or break moment format romney as he struggled to connect with voters on the campaign trail at unpunished in recent opinion polls. barack obama, polls suggested romney had come out on top. many commentators said he dominated the debate while obama lacked energy. we have this report. >> in a country is fraught with a bitter political divisions, and there is a rare moment of agreement. >> from mitt romney outshines president obama in the first date. >> the consensus of the american media -- mitt was the hit. president didn't seem to want to let go. he started with a standard campaign like -- is but it would cut taxes for the wealthy and hurt the middle-class. >> that kind of t
. it was called by the muslim brotherhood, the largest opposition party in jordan. it is pushing for more representation and a more democratic parliament. >> more than 10,000 people gathered in front of this mosque to press their demands. they are calling for less corruption and a greater say in political processes as well as less power for the monarchy. >> we want reform and a government that represents the people. right now, are around 100 people control this country. we want everyone to be represented in government. >> king abdullah ii has managed to hold on power by making no more than super -- superficial concessions to the opposition. he paved the way for elections on thursday, promising that parliament would have greater rights without encroaching on the king's powers. the muslim brotherhood wants to see real change. it has been adopting a more controversial attitude in the wake of successes -- more confrontational attitude in the wake of successes in egypt. >> everyone knows what we want. we wish to see genuine constitutional reforms. and we want a new election law. the current el
jordan is in baltimore where health officials just released the new details. >> reporter: jim, this is typically used to treat back pain, but now several people have died, one in maryland and one in virginia. doctors here say they've been able to pinpoint a two-month time frame where this injection was distributed and they think they know where it came from. >> we were notified by centers for disease control -- >> reporter: the state department of mental health and hi hygiene say patients are at risk of having meningitis. a facility in massachusetts where the injections were mixed and shipped out. there, doctors believe a fungus contaminated the product. nine facilities received shipments of the questionable steroid injections. >> this case, there were human cases, and it was tracked back to the product. >> reporter: the meningitis outbreak has reached six states with five deaths, but doctors fear the number of those with meningitis may get higher. >> we believe that there are probably hundreds of patients who may have received an injection, and those cases are currently under
and jordan river, a state connected by a highly developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed, seven years ago, my first visit to israel, it was plausible to speak of the palestinian state. now did -- now it does not. a democratic process, appointment of envoys searching for commonground, building on previous agreements like those arrived at under the prime minister don't have chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory and settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically viable palestinian state. benjamin netanyahu gave lip service to the idea, but people close to him said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will not produce a viable state. what can the next president do to change this? the only intervention that could shake israel out of the current spiral would be if a president made clear where the united states sees this h
wider war, with really serious consequences that for turkey and perhaps for jordan and saudi arabia and because of economic consequences for europe, so i am afraid that the word i tend to emphasize in ts context the prudence, rather than engagement. >> rose:. >> but i think i heard both candidates say they would not put -- it was ditches in terms of what kind of arms they might supply on the one hand communication equipment an on the other hand from -- light to heavy -- >> you can't start supplying weapons with someone without becoming tied to the consequences of that, that kind of detach. from the supply of arms and eventual engagement in the process, especially if the supply of arms creates tetation tospre that w. >> rose: what do you do about arms? >> i think you do have to know who those arms are going to, because it could come back and haunt you, obviously. >> rose: but can you control that? >> well, whether we do it or somebody else does it, you know, it is happening, so. >> rose: the arms are going in, you mean? >> but, you know, i just came back from the region also, mostly
the border with syria and jordan. washington has been insisting that we are not going to directly intervene. dinesh d'souza is here to tell us what is going on in obama's america and with our troops abroad. the supreme court takes up the question of the future of affirmative action. shannon bream was there for the argument and she will be next with the report. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms caused by acid refl disease. osteoporosis-related bone fractures and low magnesium levels have been seen with nexium. possible side effects include headache, dirhea, d abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. talk to your doctor about nexium. lou: the obama justice department rejecting claims that the south carolina law that requires voters to show photo id discriminate against minorities, since there is four weeks remain to election day. that law will not be allowed to go into effect until, however, next year. arguments in the supreme court case today could change affirmative action policies. shannon bream has the report. >> what we want? diversity. >> today,
into jordan and turkey. >>> you remember the five boys produced by the seniors in that family, five boys and he was one of them. he was studying dentistry in london. >> he has a brother maybe mort knows more about ita ruthless character. >> married, lovely wife right? >> yeah but people have given up on him as a quote reformer a long time ago. >> he is not a reformer. >> if there is any goodness left in the man, he has been directed by everybody else. >> if he goes down his people go down. john they go to the wall. they are 12%, sheer shiite, the sunni war? >> a sectarian civil war. >> if it is a civil war we are going to stay out. >> no we didn't stay out of libya. >> i think we are being pulled in. >> you think there is any sentiment in the united states to go into syria? >> not in the united states and i'm against it but we could get pulled in. the whole thing is spreading. the turks are going to be involved. >> the turks are not going to be involved. the president has spoken emfatly about that over there. >> they are involved right now. >> because of the penetration of a body border
seen strikes in lebanon. there have been a flow of refugees? jordan and turkey. we have iranian forces and ed in the fighting. as time goes on we will see more regionalization here. we also have the jihadist coming in from god knows where. >>trace: we have hezbollah, iran is still giving bashar al-assad weapons. it is time that someone, the united states and others, come in and start giving the rebels the tools they need to fight the war? >>guest: it is well past time the united states needs to take more of an active leadership role. these protests started in march of 2012 as peaceful protests. what do we have? we have extremists involved and the regionalization of the conflict. we have not done that much. what are we pressing for now? a u.n. security council resolution that probably is not going to happen. the united states needs to come up with more ideas on how we will resolve this. >>trace: we worry about bashar al-assad leafing but now it appears bashar al-assad is the greater of all evils. thank you, sir. >> if defense contractors send out thousands of letters saying they will ha
in the streets of jordan after king abdullah ii dissolved parliament and calling for new elections. the kipg has too much power but an analyst says any change to the current system could weaken support among his base. >>> now, to syria where two major stories are developing. first, turkish soldiers responded with counterfire today when a shell from syria landed near a village. remember earlier this week five people were killed in turkey when a shell crossed the border from syria. this is the fourth day the two countries have exchanged fire. a youtube video shows rebel officers holding 48 people hostage. their lives clearly in danger. joining us now is nick payton walsh who is following this story from beirut, lebanon. nick, good morning. let's start with the story in turkey. what is being done to stop the conflict and prevent more shelling? >> well, this is actually what is so worrying here. this appears to now, as you say, the fourth consecutive day. this most recent one, according to local turkish officials, they believe the syrian army was trying to hit rebels on the border, overreached and l
as a capital is a nonstarter. there is now one state between the mediterranean and the jordan river, a state connected by highly-developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed. of seven years ago on my first visit to israel, it still seemed quite plausible to speak of a palestinian state. now it does not. so i believe any kind of normal diplomatic process -- appointment of a special envoy, searching for common ground, building on previous agreements such as those arrived at under prime minister olmert and prime minister barak -- don't have much chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory ask settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically-viable palestinian state. prime minister netanyahu, i know, has given lip service to the idea, but people close to him have said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. an archipelago stands on the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will n
ties with the sunni alignment of the sunni gulf states, egypt and jordan and the shia group of iran's syria and hezbollah was not easy especially as tension rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. when you look initially at russian concerns in the arab spring, it can spread to russia was efforts on the same problems as the arab states, autocratic government, widespread corruption and rising prices and indeed democracy demonstrators were shouting the revolutionary train stopped at the station in cairo, next stop moscow. the second concern, islam is my takeover and in a ending chaos and further inspire the islamists and north caucasus and increasingly and khe sanh as well. number three is oil and gas investments in the middle east could be jeopardized as well as the business and arms sales deals and number four when libya occurred, the russians i think that the major lesson purgative stained on the u.n. security council vote in the no-fly zone in bolivia thereby supporting the arab consensus and continuing the widened russian p
such as saudi arabia, uae and jordan, and in 2008 he added libya to the expanding arc of activity. putin's goals were fourfold. number one, demonstrate russia was again a major power in the middle east and the world. number two, gain -- for projects while selling sophisticated products like nuclear reactors and railway systems. number three, as the cost and difficulty of extracting russian oil and natural gas grew to gain joint ventures in oil and natural gas extraction with countries like saudi arabia, iran, uae, libya and iraq. and number four and certainly very important, to prevent the arab states from aiding the islamic resistance movements in the north caucuses that were beginning to spread through the rest of russia. but keeping good ties with the sunni alignment in egypt and jordan and the shia group of hezbollah was not easy, especially as tensions rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. now, when you look initially at russian concerns with the arab spring, a, it could spread to russia which suffered some of the same problems as
there are upheavals in places like jordan, bahrain or even saudi arabia. so i'm not sure we have the luxury of consistency. i think what both of them were saying was that the middle east is extraordinarily complex. governor romney said two interesting things i thought. one is that what the united states did in iraq and afghanistan cannot be a template for the future. thed idea we're going to continue to send hundreds of thousands of americans to remake other societies, that's clearly a nonstarter. and then he said -- i think his phrase was -- we can't kill ourselves out of this mess. there has to be something else dealing with extremism and the muslim and arab world other than simply traditional counterterrorism and drone attacks. there has to be something larger to try to encourage the evolution of these societies so essentially young men don't make the career choice of becoming terrorists. i think that's a big idea. it's easier to articulate than implement it but i think again to me it's a welcome add toyings to the debate. >> woodruff: what about those two points, nick burns and what did
,000 syrians, sending them fleeing into turkey, jordan, iraq, and other countries. on thursday, syrian refugee described the conditions at one camp in a rebel controlled area near the turkish border. >> we're living in very difficult conditions. we are witnessing a lot of sorrow garbage is throwing -- is thrown everywhere. there are over 500 families here. words cannot express the hardship we live in. i challenge anyone to live here for even two hours. >> the leader of the lebanese militant group hezbollah has admitted to launching an iranian-made drone over israel in a rare incursion into israel's carefully controlled airspace. the unmanned drone was shot down by israel which regularly sends its own fighter planes over lebanon. u.s. drone strikes killed of the 16 people in northwestern pakistan thursday and wounded a dozen others. anonymous officials said the targets were militants at a compound. the u.s. border patrol agent opened fire on people throwing rocks from the mexican side of the border, apparently killing a teenage boy. 16-year-old jose antonio elena rodriquez was found dead from g
. >> it is spreading already. it is spreading to lebanon and jordan. >> the husband of violence. -- there has not been of violence in lebanon. at the same time, there is so many other places where you could have a fire began. -- which i think the russians are, here. >> i agree that russia is unlikely to help us in the united states. we have tried three times in the u.n.. cotton three vetoes in return. best case, maybe i was in china a few months ago. talking about, maybe they should concentrate on domestic problems, rather than having a domestic -- rather than having an aggressive domestic foreign policy. it is a possibility. i would give you my worst case, and it may be unfolding before our eyes. nato has guarantee turkey's borders. in case, what happened in just a week ago flares up -- more shelling. remember when i said in my presentation. he decides -- nonetheless, he might escalate the conflict the russians will not intervene. they said they -- their treaty with syria is not going to guarantee russian aid. we could see a nice war opening up with my then dragged into russia with the iranians. then
and medium enterprises in egypt, jordan, mori row koa, and yemen. partners work together to provide functional expertise and technical assistance to foster growth, improve job creation, and improve and create our jobs economic development. the overseas private investment corporation committed or improved more than in insurance and transportation, finance, ict and franchising as well as support for small and medium enterprises. now, well before the arab spring, of course, as you know, the u.s. was engaged in economic development in the region. in 2007, for example, the challenge corporation started a five year, $700 million compact with morocco to simulate economic growth in investments in projects that rangedded from small scale fisheries to financial services and enterprise support. the ncc remains an active player in the region with a recent $275 million compact with jordan and a planned program to address the main con straints of tunisia's economic growth. i could go on and talk about the fund created and the egyptian enterprise fund, but, in fact, our weakened efforts are not li
, turkey, jordan. i think everybody is watching very closely to see how the revolution within the country is changing, how it is implementing more extremist tactics, how people are becoming more radicalized. at the same time syrians would say do you think we want extremists to come in and hijack our revolution? of course we don't. but we're drowning and we asked you. we said give me your hand and you wouldn't give it to us. and they will, so we'll take it. >> every syrian activist with the opposition will tell you they've seen iranian fighters inside, that they've seen fighters with hezbollah, the lebanese shiite militia. there's a strong sense that the syria regime could not survive this were it not for the assistance of iran and, of course, hezbollah and the russians. >> great to see you. >> clarissa, thank you. >>> cbs has learned that the u.s. mission in libya repeatedly asked for more security before the attacks on the consulate in benghazi. 13 confirmed security threats in the six months before the attack. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed three weeks ag
been a concern. i mean, we've seen these shells land in lebanon and jordan, but not quite to the same effect. turkey is a key by the way, of the syrian rebels. been quite open in its support for them. many of them do seem to have some sort of refuge in southern turkey, that particular border area where much of it kind of under rebel control if you take out of the equation the syrian regime air power. i think the concern really is we're now seeing this exchange of fire suggesting that the turkish and syrian military are almost facing off against each other. is this going to continue? we have not seen the syrian apology, and syria almost cried to blame rebel groups, terrorists perhaps behind some of these shells. an unwillingness i think for both sides to accept a step back perhaps, and certainly turkey very keen to show that it will not tolerate any more syrian aggression. turkey is a nato member here, so the consequences of this escalating are very great in deed. >> nick, thank you. >>> as the fighting rages on, an ex-patriot syrian doctor is back in safetism jim clancy that is detail
is on tender hooks. in lebanon, turkey, jordan. everybody is watching very closely to see how the revolution within the country is changing face, how it is implementing more extremist tactic, how people are become being more radicalized. at the same time what the syrians would say to me you think we want extremists to come in and hijack our revolution. we don't. we're drowning. we ask you to give us your hand and you won, they will so we'll take it. >> is the syrian government getting any support from outside like iran? >> they've seen iranian fighters inside, seen fighters with hezbollah, the lebanese shi'ite regime. the syrian regime count exist without the support of iran and hezbollah and the russians. >> great to see you. >> clarissa, thank you. >> cbs has learned the u.s. mission in libya repeatedly asked for better security before last month's attack on the american consulate in benghazi. a state department officer said there were 13 confirmed security threats in the six months before the attack. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed three weeks ago. critics a
significant implications for the production profile. it is countries like jordan, lebanon. syria is at the heart of the middle east. if this thing drags on, it could be ugly for a number of nations. connell: it seems to get worse by the day but by the week it escalates. in other words i thought it was interesting to hear you say right at the top that the people over there are assuming or wondering whether the united states is going to get involved. that seems to be a step further than we've thought about it here. we're all kind of assuming we won't get involved. and maybe we should be thinking about it differently, i don't know. >> absolutely. when i was in turkey, they assumed the government would not be so forward leaning if the united states and the rest of nato would have their back. the obama administration has given no signal that he's even willing to do more. even romney has talked about providing more support for the rebels but it is not really clear. no one is talking about active intervention on the side of syrian rebels. dagen: is there in reason to believe that presid
. >> is called the kings academy, the idea was born out of king abdullah of jordan's own experience of boarding school here in the u.s. few thought a private coed boarding school in the heart of the middle east could succeed a few years after it opened its doors, the school is thriving, growing and attracting some of the region's best and brightest students. in a region steeped in conservative tradition, a modern laboratory of learning is breaking new ground. >> 167. >> reporter: where boys and girls study together, play side by side and can even use dance to express themselves freely. this is not your typical middle eastern school. instead, it's one preparing students for whatever life's punches come their way. and to bring a new vision to a region that's been mar roomed into turmoil for generations. it was king abdullah's experience at deerfield college in massachusetts that inspired this model academy. >> independence of thought. the ability to reason critically. respect for different points of view. those are the intellectual values that we value here. >> reporter: the school's mission is t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)